Malaysia turned down offer to lead investigation into MH17

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Malaysia was offered to lead the technical investigation into the cause of the crash of MH17. However Malaysia turned down the offer. This was said during a conference on MH17 by the former director-general  of the department of Civil Aviation Authority ( previously known as the Department of Civil Aviation) in Malaysia,  Datuk Seri Azharuddin Abd Rahman. His words is another proof statements by Malaysian prime minister Mahathir about not being allowed to study the black boxes are nonsense.

“We told them that we were too occupied with MH370, which happened four months before that. We were far away from the crash site,” he said.”

Azharuddin, who was one of those attending the conference in Malaysia, stood up to answer Russian former Kremlin financed RT journalist Yana Yerlashova who had asked why Malaysia was not heading the investigations and was not keeping the data retrieved from the MH17 “black box” (flight data recorder).

Azharuddin criticized Yerlashova : “You have to tell the public that there are two teams for MH17, but you only mentioned JIT (the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team). The Dutch Safety Board published the full report few years back on what happened.”

Azharuddin also shared with the audience that Malaysia downloaded and listened to the voice recordings from the black boxes of the aircraft before it was officially handed over to the Dutch authorities.

“We have downloaded and listened (from the recordings from the black boxes) as we wanted to know what exactly happened the last seconds of the incident.”

A Malaysian team who travelled to Eastern Ukraine retrieved the black boxes from the separatists. This was possible by some unusual diplomatic process lead by Malaysian PM Razak. In Kiev, Malaysian ambassador  handed over the black boxes to Dutch officials. These were then flown the same night to Farnborough for analysis by the British  Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB).

The words of the former director-general contradict earlier statements made by the prime minister of Malaysia, Mahathir Mohammed. End of May 2019 the prime minster said at a pressconference in Japan:

“We may not have the expertise, but we can buy the expertise. For some reasons, Malaysia was not allowed to check the black box to see what happened.”

After Malaysia rejected the offer to lead the investigation, Dutch Safety Board took the lead. The final report of the DSB stated observers of Malaysia were present when the data was downloaded from the CVR and FDR (“black boxes”). The DSB report also states representatives of Malaysia attended listening session of the Cockpit Voice Recorder audio.

Malaysian transport Minister Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai at 24 July 2014 stated :

Three Malaysian representatives, including Depart­ment of Civil Aviation director-general Datuk Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, were part of the 10-man delegation that had flown to Farnborough. (source)

 

Azharuddin said all the evidence was kept by the Dutch authorities. “This is because the prosecution of this case would be done  at the court in the Netherlands. That is why it (all the evidence including the black boxes) is with the authorities there. It is the same with the Lockerbie incident involving Pan Am Flight. The international requirement is that the evidence is kept at the place where the prosecution is being conducted,” he said.

Source: New Strait Times 

 

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4 Comments on Malaysia turned down offer to lead investigation into MH17

  1. Why Azharuddin was invited to this conference?

  2. “Azharuddin also shared with the audience that Malaysia downloaded and listened to the voice recordings from the black boxes of the aircraft before it was officially handed over to the Dutch authorities.”

    I had also read that in the NST article. But I cannot believe that the Malaysian team has been able to listen to the voice recordings between the moment that they received the boxes on the 21st and the moment they were handed over to the Dutch ambassador and the investigators on the 22nd (Appendix H of the DSB report). When could they have done that? In the train, in the hotel? Did they have the tools to download the data, and if they had, why bring the thing to Farnborough? The NST reporter probably misunderstood Azharuddin’s words. It is much more likely that Azharuddin said, or meant to say, that he and his team was present when the data was downloaded from the “black boxes” at Farnborough. Anyway, even if they had been able to listen to the recordings before “Farnborough”, apparently they did not come to different conclusions. And Mr Mahathir clearly did not know what he talked about when he stated that “for some reasons, Malaysia was not allowed to check the black box to see what happened”.

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